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Tag Archives: teaching
Tutorial: Using VMD for visualizing proteins

Tutorial: Using VMD for visualizing proteins

The short PHY542: VMD Tutorial provides a short introduction to basic use of the VMD (“Visual Molecular Dynamics”) software to visualize and analyze proteins and molecular dynamics trajectories.

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PHY542/NAN542/PHY498 — Topics in Biophysics I

PHY542/NAN542/PHY498 — Topics in Biophysics I

This course is an introduction to biophysics for graduate and senior undergraduate students from physics, chemistry, engineering or related fields. The goal of this lecture is to give you the basics to understand and critically analyze recent publications in the interdisciplinary field of biophysics and develop a sense for how to model biological processes using physical principles.

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PHY494/PHY598/CHM598 — Simulation approaches to Bio- and Nanophysics

PHY494/PHY598/CHM598 — Simulation approaches to Bio- and Nanophysics

The course will teach you the theoretical background on how to simulate systems at the atomic scale (e.g. using molecular dynamics), you will learn to program some of the fundamental algorithms, and you will be using state-of-the art software to run simulations of problems in areas of active research. The focus is on bio/nanophysics but there’s room to accommodate individual interests. The course will be half lecture, half hands-on work in a computer lab.

Note that this course is currently not scheduled. It ran the last time in Spring 2013.

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Introduction to the command line

Introduction to the command line

As a computational scientist you have one primary tool at your hand: a computer. In order to get most out of it you have to communicate with it via text commands, entered on the command line. This article points to some resources that should help you to learn how to do this.

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Teaching, Tutorials, and Projects

Teaching, Tutorials, and Projects

When you think about how you really learned those things that you are good at then chances are that this did not come from a lecture or a video. For many people, learning and understanding comes from working on a problem (often “hitting your head against a wall until the wall yields”) or explaining it to others.

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